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MEET OUR SPEAKERS!

 

We’re delighted to welcome renowned speakers from around the world to

EduFest Le Rosey, International Festival of Education 2019.

 

Discover the full festival line-up below!

Shireen Ali-Khan EduFest Le Rosey
Shireen Ali-Khan

Shireen is an educator and researcher, she teaches at the International School of Geneva and is working on her doctoral research and dissertation with the University of Durham, U.K.

Professor Becky Allen
Becky Allen

Becky Allen is Chief Analyst and a co-founder of Teacher Tapp, the largest teacher survey and professional development tool in the UK. Until 2018, she was Professor of Education at UCL Institution of Education.

Cesla Amarelle EduFest Le Rosey
Cesla Amarelle
FESTIVAL KEYNOTE – Presentation announced soon!

Élue au Conseil d’État le 21 mai 2017, Cesla Amarelle est à la tête du Département de la formation, de la jeunesse et de la culture (DFJC) depuis le 1er juillet 2017. Session delivered in French.

Neil Atkin EduFest Le Rosey
Neil Atkin

Insatiably curious, Neil uses scientific thinking to push most things to breaking point and to see what can be learned, always trying to get students to embrace failure as a learning experience and to build resilience.

Shabana Basij-Rasikh EduFest
Shabana Basij-Rasikh

Shabana Basij-Rasikh is the Co-founder and President of the School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA) which is the first and only all-girls boarding school in Afghanistan.

Cecile Beer EduFest Le Rsoey
Cécile Beer

Cécile Beer holds a PhD in Lettres from the Sorbonne, Paris and University of Neuchâtel. She is director and founder of Excellence en français and Chief of Marking for international French examinations DELF-DALF. Session delivered in French.

Tom Bennett EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Tom Bennett

Tom Bennett is the founder of researchED, a grass-roots organisation that raises research literacy in education. In 2015, he became the UK government’s school ‘Behaviour Czar’.

Adam Boxer EduFest Le Rosey
Adam Boxer

A current science teacher, as a lead practitioner for evidence based practice, Adam specialises in applying the findings of cognitive sciences to education for teaching expertise.

Alvin Carpio EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Alvin Carpio

Alvin Carpio is founder and Chief Executive of The Fourth Group, a public advocacy group established to shape tech for all, leaving nobody behind. In 2017 he was listed on Forbes 30 under 30 for his work.

Sameena Choudry EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Sameena Choudry

Sameena Choudry is the founder of Equitable Education Ltd. and co-founder of #WomenEd. She set up her own educational consultancy because she feels that being in charge of your own career and destiny is extremely empowering.

Kerstyn Comley EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Dr Kerstyn Comley

With over twenty year experience in business, research & development, Dr Kerstyn Comley is an education technologist, volunteer teacher and co-CEO of MeeTwo Education, with its multi-award winning teenage mental health app, MeeTwo.

Costa Constantinou EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Costa Constantinou

Costa Constantinou is Veema Education’s driving force and has many years of experience both within the classroom and at leadership level, understanding first-hand the needs and priorities of schools today.

Jules Daulby EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Jules Daulby

Jules Daulby is a literacy and inclusion expert, podcaster of The Inclusive Classroom and co-founder and national leader of #WomenEd, a grassroots organisation created to support existing and aspiring women leaders.

Pedro de Bruyckere EduFest
Pedro De Bruyckere

Pedro De Bruyckere is an educational scientist at Arteveldehogeschool in Ghent, Belgium. He has co-written several books on youth and education in Dutch and is an in-demand international public speaker on education.

Aryaman Darda Institut Le Rosey EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Aryaman Darda, Student at Institut Le Rosey

Aryaman is a grade 11 student at Institut Le Rosey, Switzerland, with a deep interest in wildlife. In 2017, he launched ‘Little Planet Foundation’, a non-profit initiative to promote wildlife and nature conservation.

David Didau EduFest Le Rosey 2019
David Didau

David Didau has worked as both a teacher and educator and is the author of several books on education including Making Kids Clever: A manifesto for closing the advantage gap. He is a prominent blogger and commentator on social media.

Pierre Dillenbourg EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Pierre Dillenbourg

A former teacher in elementary school, Pierre Dillenbourg graduated in educational science (University of Mons, Belgium) and holds a PhD in computer science in the domain of artificial intelligence applications for education. Session delivered in French.

Tom Duckling EduFest Le Rosey
Tom Duckling

Tom Duckling is Assistant-Deputy Head (Curriculum) of Aiglon College, a TOK, History and Psychology teacher who is passionate about improving student learning.

Katrina Edmunds EduFest Le Rosey
Katrina Edmunds

Associate Director of Guidance at Institut Le Rosey, Katrina is an experienced international university counsellor who is focused on empowering young people to make the most of their present and future.

Keziah Featherstone EduFest Le Rosey
Keziah Featherstone

Co-founder and National Leader of #WomenEd, co-editor of 10% Braver and member of non-political think tank the Headteachers’ Roundtable, Keziah is current Head at Q3 Academy Tipton, a large urban multi-cultural comprehensive school in the Black Country.

Liz Free EduFest Le Rosey
Liz Free

Liz Free has been a teacher and head teacher in some of the world’s leading schools and is now a globally recognised leader of education talent, continuing professional development and learning (CPDL) services.

Nadine Gaudin EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Nadine Gaudin

Nadine Gaudin is a certified Positive Discipline Lead Trainer (Schools, Parenting, Early Childhood, Workplace) working across the world and was a teacher for 15 years now training over 1000 school staff each year. Session delivered in French.

Stuart Grieve EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Stuart Grieve

Stuart Grieve is a sport and youth development consultant with experience working with organisations across a wide range of sport, education and community sectors. He currently works as a consultant with UEFA.

Philippe Gudin EduFest Le Rosey
Philippe Gudin
Presentation announced soon!

A graduate in Mathematics and Economics, Philippe Gudin has devoted his life to education. As the Director of Le Rosey, he raised the finest Swiss Internat to the ranks of the leading British and American boarding schools. Session delivered in French.

David Hawley EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Dr David Hawley

Dr David Hawley took up his post as Director General of the International School of Geneva in August 2017. He holds a Doctorate of Education in Administration, Planning and Social Policy from Harvard University.

Coming soon!
Gianni Infantino
CLOSING SPEAKER – Presentation announced soon!

More information coming soon!

Tiffany Jolowicz EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Tiffany Jolowicz

Tiffany Jolowicz graduated from the European Business School and is researching how parents and/or mentors can enable students to achieve their potential and make excellent university applications.

Laura Kaub EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Laura Kaub

Laura Kaub has over a decade of experience in helping young African leaders gain access to and succeed in tertiary education in the United States and around the world. She sits on the African Leadership Academy’s U.S. Advisory Council.

Paul Kelley EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Dr Paul Kelley

Dr Paul Kelley spent 40 years as a full-time secondary teacher and headteacher in challenging state schools in the North of England and has also been a researcher at Oxford and The Open University.

Paul Kirschner EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Paul A. Kirschner

One of the academics behind Cognitive Load Theory, Paul A. Kirschner is Distinguished University Professor and Professor of Educational Psychology of the Open University of the Netherlands.

Kim Kovacevic EduFest Le Rosey
Kim Kovacevic

Kim Kovacevic is a teacher of History with 23 years’ experience. He previously worked at The London Oratory School and is currently Academic Dean at Institut Le Rosey.

Alison Kriel EduFest Le Rosey
Alison Kriel

Alison Kriel has a passion for values led leadership, staff and pupil wellbeing. She is an experienced Head Teacher and Independent Education Consultant and is currently setting up new education platform, Above and Beyond.

Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Dundee, UK, an expert in applying findings from Cognitive Science to education, and an enthusiastic science communicator.

Coming soon!
Juan ma Sevillano
Presentation announced soon!

More information coming soon!

Elisabeth Marksteiner EduFest Le Rosey
Elisabeth Marksteiner

Elisabeth Marksteiner graduated from Clare College Cambridge with a degree English and is trained teacher. A compulsive reader, she is writing a book on Oxford and Cambridge admissions, also serving on the board of the International Association for College Admission Counseling.

Stephanie Lin Mayor EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Shu Ling Stephanie Lin Mayor

Stephanie Lin Mayor is a trained Neuro-Linguistic Programming Practitioner. As a long-term meditation practitioner as well, she strongly believes that mindful awareness can change the functional structure of our brain.

Loic Menzies EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Loic Menzies

Loic Menzies is Chief Executive of the UK’s education and youth ‘think and action-tank’ LKMco, currently editing their first book for Routledge entitled, Young People on the Margins. He has worked in education research and policy for the last ten years.

Raphael Minder EduFest Le Rosey 2019 NYTimes
Raphael Minder

Born in Geneva in 1971, Raphael has been a full-time journalist since 1993, when he started working in Switzerland for Bloomberg News. He has been based in Madrid as the Spain and Portugal correspondent for The New York Times since April 2010.

Martin Musálek EduFest Le Rosey 2019
PhDr. Martin Musálek, PhD.

Martin Musálek is Assistant Professor at the Department of Kinanthropology and Humanities, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague, teaching about Motor Development, Kinanthropometry and Methodology.

Vivienne Porritt EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Vivienne Porritt

Co-founder, National Leader and Chair of #WomenEd and co-editor of 10% Braver, Vivienne works with school leaders on impact evaluation, vision, strategy and professional learning and development, as well as women’s leadership.

Liam Printer EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Liam Printer

Liam Printer is a passionate languages teacher with 12 years’ teaching experience, currently completing his Doctorate of Education (EdD) and teaching at the International School of Lausanne, Switzerland.

Coming soon!
Dr. Olivier Revol

Dr Olivier Revol is the author of several scientific publications which discuss early years intelligence, hyperactivity and learning difficulties. He is director of child neuro-psychiatrics at CHU Lyon and has for the past thirty years, dedicated his life to the pleasure of learning at school. Session delivered in French.

Jan Rihak EduFest Le Rosey
Jan Rihak

Presentation announced soon!

Jan Rihak is CEO of Classtime, a fun and easy to use solution for teachers that helps them fully engage their students, giving them immediate transparency on learning progress, and saving them substantial amounts of time. He joins us from Swiss EdTech Collider from the EPFL Innovation Park.

Duncan Robinson EduFest Le Rosey
Duncan Robinson

Duncan Robinson has over 15 years teaching internationally and leading expeditions all over the world. He is project leader at Inspired Global Camps – a worldwide network of exceptional opportunities for young people.

Niall Sclater EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Niall Sclater

Niall Sclater is consultant and director at Sclater Digital, an educational technology consultancy. Niall was previously Director of Learning and Teaching at the Open University, responsible for institutional strategy.

Anthony Seldon EduFest 2019
Sir Anthony Seldon
FESTIVAL KEYNOTE – Presentation announced soon!

Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of The University of Buckingham since 2015, is one of Britain’s leading contemporary historians educationalists, commentators and political authors.

Paul Teulon EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Paul Teulon

Paul Teulon is Director of Admissions at King’s College London and is responsible for both undergraduate and postgraduate admissions. He is also a Governor and Chair of the Education Committee at the LAE.

Govinda Upadhyay EduFest Le Rosey
Govinda Upadhyay
Presentation announced soon!

Govinda is CEO of LEDsafari, an education start-up based out of Lausanne that provides an online teacher training platform.  He joins us from Swiss EdTech Collider from the EPFL Innovation Park.

Floyd Woodrow EduFest Le Rosey 2019
Floyd Woodrow

Floyd Woodrow was one of the youngest soldiers ever to be selected for the UK’s elite Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) at the age of 22. He is now Managing Director and founder of Chrysalis Worldwide, a world leading values-based organisation, owner of Quantum Group and creator of Compass For Life.

Ali Yusaf EduFest Le Rosey
Ali Yusaf

Ali Yusaf is an expert in International School Accreditation with over twenty years’ experience working in boarding schools principally in the UAE, Norway and Switzerland..

Bukky Yusuf EduFest Le Rosey
Bukky Yusuf

Bukky Yusuf is a Secondary Science teacher, Science senior leader and consultant. She has spent two decades in London schools, teaching Science, A level Chemistry and Level 3 BTEC.

Click below to see the full festival programme.

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"Concept Based Education; what's the big idea?"

 

We are no longer living in the information age but in the conceptual age. It is not specialist content knowledge of individuals that is relied upon, but the ability to solve problems, think critically and to adapt to new environments by utilizing transferability of ideas.-Daniel Pink, “A Whole New Mind”, (2005)

This session will:
• Introduce Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction for educators
• Challenge you to reflect on what big ideas you want your learners to leave the classroom with
• Explore the value of teaching for transferable understandings as opposed to teaching topics and facts that are locked in time, place and specific situations
• Discuss the structures of learning that support teaching for transferable ideas
• Discuss implications for practice

When constructing curriculum that is concept based, get ready for a mental work out. The results of your investment and reflection will leave you with a systematic and well thought out unit of inquiry.

Session outcomes:
Have an understanding of what concept-based curriculum and instruction looks like and its implications for your practice
Be able to identify and work with concepts and constructing statements of relationship between them to create enduring understandings
The following paper will serve as valuable pre-reading, however, a general overview will be shared at the session with further in-depth discussion of the points therein: http://www.ibmidatlantic.org/Concept_Based_Teaching_Learning.pdf

Shireen Ali-Khan

 

Shireen is an educator and researcher, she teaches at the International School of Geneva and is working on her doctoral research and dissertation with the University of Durham, U.K. Shireen trained as a psychologist in London and New York before becoming a teacher and teacher trainer. She is a certified (H. Lynn. Erickson & Lois Lanning) presenter, workshop leader and consultant in concept-based curriculum and instruction and has presented in Geneva and the U.K for the past several years to preservice and in-service educators as well as to students. Shireen welcomes the opportunity to connect with other educators that have an interest in educational research, to share findings and exchange thoughts on the research and writing process. If you would like to learn more or even collaborate with her on educational research, you can reach Shireen at Shireen.Ali-Khan@durham.ac.uk.

What are we measuring pupil progress for?

 

We need valid and reliable measures of pupil progress in subjects so that we know who is off-track, if a whole class is struggling, and where teachers need support. Or do we? Measuring pupil progress might be a desirable aspiration, but we haven’t yet agreed how to do it reliably in most subjects. Each subject has its own unique knowledge domain, which in turn determines how we are able to report what a child has learnt. This talk explains where we are today and how we might move forward from here.

Becky Allen

 

Becky Allen is Chief Analyst and a co-founder of Teacher Tapp, the largest teacher survey and professional development tool in the UK. Until 2018, she was Professor of Education at UCL Institution of Education and over her academic career she has written extensively on school accountability, admissions, expenditure and teacher careers. An economist by training and former secondary school teacher, she is an expert in the analysis of large datasets. Between 2014 and 2017, she was the founding Director of Education Datalab, a non profit research organisation that has developed a reputation for making complex, quantitative analysis accessible for those involved with running schools. In 2018, she chaired a Government working group to review how data is used in schools. In addition to her day job at Teacher Tapp, Becky continues to work directly with schools on research to help them make better use of data. Her book on teacher careers called ‘The Teacher Gap’ was published last year.

Cesla Amarelle

 

Née le 14 septembre 1973 à Montevideo, Cesla Amarelle s’installe à la fin des années 1970 à Yverdon-les-Bains où elle vit toujours avec son mari et leurs deux filles. Après des études et différentes charges d’enseignement et de recherches en droit suisse, international et européen à l’UNIL et l’UNIFR, elle rejoint l’Université de Neuchâtel où elle est nommée professeure ordinaire de droit constitutionnel et public dès 2015. Cesla Amarelle est également membre du projet « Centre d'excellence de droit des migrations » retenu par la Conférence universitaire suisse et Project Leader dans le cadre du National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) « On the Move – The Migration-Mobility Nexus ».

Sur le plan politique, Cesla Amarelle adhère au Parti socialiste en 1999. Élue successivement au Conseil communal de Lausanne en 2006 puis au Grand Conseil du canton de Vaud en 2007, elle entre au Conseil communal d’Yverdon-les-Bains en 2009 et assure la présidence du Parti socialiste vaudois de 2008 à 2012. Élue à deux reprises au Conseil national, elle y siège de 2011 à 2017 et y préside notamment la Commission des institutions politiques de 2013 à 2015.

Tout au long de son parcours, Cesla Amarelle s’est engagée dans le domaine associatif en tant que membre des comités de la Croix-Rouge et de l’ASLOCA mais aussi comme présidente de la Fédération des Associations d’Etudiant-e-s de l’Université de Lausanne (FAE), de la Fédération Romande des Consommateurs (FRC) Vaud et de l’association de coordination romande des associations d’action en santé psychique (CORAASP).

Resilience: improving your own and that of your learners

 

Part personal journey and part research this session aims to look at what resilience is and why all of us lack it at times. It is a very practical session which will equip delegates with a toolkit that may help them and others deal with adversity effectively. We will also consider the factors that can lead to a lack of resilience and strategies to help build strength. Particular attention will be paid to high achieving girls who are often very fragile and terrified of failure of any sort.

Rubbish Science: Use rubbish, solve real problems and develop scientific literacy. Rethink science! Interesting things require more thought. You can turn a plastic bottle into a fly trap in the matter of seconds, but then spend a lifetime optimising the design. What bait should we use ? Where should we put it? What colour should it be? Rubbish Science experiments all have unknown outcomes, with multiple variables adding complexity to solutions. It is however the learning journey that is the most important thing, leading to transferable skills. We deliver our workshops to some of the most disadvantaged people in the world; street kids and those who live on dumps. We also run the same challenges in schools in developed nations and students share their ideas with each other in a truly global classroom.

Neil Atkin

 

Neil has taught some of the most and least compliant students, the highest and lowest achievers and the richest and poorest across four continents. The similarities between these students is
far greater than the differences between them.

Insatiably curious he uses scientific thinking to push most things to breaking point and to see what can be learned. Always trying to get students to embrace failure as a learning experience and to build resilience.

Neil founded the charity Rubbish Science that uses things like discarded plastic bottles to trap mosquitoes or build solar stills or hydroponic plant systems. It is the learning journey that is more important than the end result. We use technology to connect people across the World on a level playing field to see what we can learn from each other. A planned project will have students from a Swiss Boarding school sharing ideas with children who live on a Rubbish dump in Sierra Leone.

Today, I am here, I am brave": Stories from an Afghan Girls' School

 

Summary: 2019 may prove to be one of the most transformative years in Afghanistan's recent history. With a presidential election scheduled -- and with U.S.--Taliban peace talks ongoing -- the hard-earned civil rights of Afghan women and girls are anything but certain. In these unsettled days, come onto the campus of Afghanistan's only private boarding school for girls, the School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA), and hear the stories of the students as told by SOLA co-founder Shabana Basij-Rasikh. Shabana herself studied in secret under the Taliban when she was a child; her past motivates her certainty that investing in girls' education is a nation's path to a prosperous future.

Shabana Basij-Rasikh

 

Shabana is the co-founder and president of the School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA), the first and only boarding school for girls in her homeland. SOLA provides Afghan girls with a rigorous education that promotes critical thinking, a sense of purpose, and respect for self and others, and prepares them to become the confident women who will lead a peaceful and united Afghanistan.

Born and raised in Kabul, Shabana completed high school in the U.S. through the State Department’s Youth Exchange Studies program. She went on to attend Middlebury College in Vermont, graduating magna cum laude in International Studies and Women & Gender Studies in 2011.

It was in 2008, while still a Middlebury undergrad, that Shabana created SOLA. From its beginnings as a school of four students in a rented house, SOLA has grown to become a school of nearly 70 girls in grades 6-8, representing 23 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces, all of whom live and study on a secure campus in Kabul. SOLA intends to more than double its student body over the next several years, with the goal of enrolling approximately 175 girls in grades 6-12, representing all 34 Afghan provinces, by the year 2022.

Shabana, and SOLA, are recognized in Afghanistan and around the world as pioneers in girls’ education. Earlier this year, Afghanistan’s President and First Lady awarded Shabana the Malalai Medal – one of Afghanistan’s highest civilian honors, and given in acknowledgement of her work for equality in education. Shabana is a global ambassador for Girl Rising, an international campaign for girls’ education; was named one of CNN International’s Leading Women of 2014; and holds an honorary doctorate from SOAS University of London.

Teaching French literature in a digital era

 

Literature – classic or contemporary – unlocks an essential route to better understanding and appreciation of the French language and francophone culture. As a written support for literacy and serving as a stimulus for oral discussion, literature is a fundamental tool to develop all skills of French language learning.

However, now in a digital era, the analysis of literary texts is often sidelined, with greater emphasis given to language textbooks and resources based around students’ daily lives. So how, exactly, should we be teaching literature in today’s classrooms? What strategies can we employ to motivate students?

This session will address a modern and multimedia approach to teaching literature in a digital era, discussing the use of image, video and audio, as well as online resources and new technologies, all with the collective intention of bringing literature to life in the classroom. Examples of activities will be presented throughout.

Cécile Beer

 

Cécile Beer holds a PhD in Lettres from the Sorbonne, Paris and University of Neuchâtel. Her thesis on “The love rivalry between father and son in French 17th century theatre” was published in the Editions Universitaires Européennes and she is a regular writer for several academic journals.

Cécile Beer is also director and founder of Excellence en français, which offers lessons to master the French language as well as writing and proofreading of texts. She teaches French language and literature at university - EPFL, Université de Neuchâtel, HEP de Zurich - and is also a teacher trainer, giving frequent workshops and seminars to teachers of French.

Specialised in the teaching of classical and contemporary French literature, she works with a multimedia approach to material, drawing upon the latest digital resources to fully exploit literary texts in class.

Cécile Beer is also a member and leader of marking for international French examinations DELF-DALF.

Creating a Culture: what does evidence tell us about getting the best behaviour from students

 

Running a room is a fundamental skill for any teacher to master, no matter what kind of classroom they run. But far too frequently, teachers receive very little guidance in this skill. Drawing from evidence bases around the world, Tom will explore what data we have from research that can inform what we do in this most vital of areas, and how we can achieve cultures of effort, civility and aspiration in even the most difficult of circumstances.

Tom Bennett

 

Tom Bennett is the founder of researchED, a grass-roots organisation that raises research literacy in education. Since 2013 researchED has visited and 13 countries, attracting thousands of followers. In 2015 he became the UK government’s school ‘Behaviour Czar’, advising on behaviour policy.

He has written four books about teacher training, and in 2015 he was long listed as one of the world's top teachers in the GEMS Global Teacher Prize. In the same year he made the Huffington Post's 'Top Ten Global Bloggers' list.

His online resources have been viewed over 1.2 million times. www.researchED.org.uk

 

Schools, content and creativity: how to grow brilliant students

 

How to inspire intellectual brilliance, rigour and flexibility is the key question facing 21st century schools. In this session, Adam will use empirical research from the cognitive sciences to investigate the importance of deep knowledge and understanding to higher cognitive functions like creativity and innovation.

Adam Boxer

 

Adam is a science teacher working at a school in North London. As a lead practitioner for evidence based practice, he specialises in applying the findings of cognitive sciences to education in developing teaching expertise. He writes regularly on schools, science and education and has presented at a number of national conferences.

The power of second chances: A conversation between Alvin Carpio (former pupil) and Kim Kovacevic (former teacher)

 

Alvin Carpio currently runs United Citizens, a global movement committed to shaping the fourth industrial revolution for all, leaving nobody behind. Hear him speak with his former teacher, Kim Kovacevic, who once nearly banned him from participating in a mock election at school before giving him a second chance. That mock election gave Alvin his first experience of political campaigning. He has since gone on to campaign on issues of social justice and human rights, and to advise governments and multinational corporations. In 2017 he was listed on Forbes 30 Under 30 for his work in law and policy.

Alvin Carpio

 

Alvin Carpio is founder and Chief Executive of The Fourth Group, a public advocacy group established to shape tech for all, leaving nobody behind. Previously he spent the last decade campaigning on human rights and social justice issues as a community organiser and lobbyist for people in poverty. In 2017 he was listed on Forbes 30 under 30 for his work. Most recently The Fourth Group launched a new global democratic membership organisation called The Fourth Group to bring people together to address global issues.

#10%braver. How @WomenEd resonated across the world

 

#WomenED began with a group of women drinking coffee after a twitter conversation and reactions to some blog posts about women in education leadership. Since, it has become international with over 22000 followers on twitter, mentioned in England’s Department of Education white paper and was voted Top 10 influencers in 2018 TES awards. This year, a @WomenEd book is to be has published called #10%braver.

The national leaders will be interviewed on a panel chaired by Jules Daulby, also a national leader, to talk about what impact #WomenEd has made and themes in their book.

Sameena Choudry

 

Sameena Choudry is the founder of Equitable Education Ltd. and co-founder of #WomenEd. She set up her own educational consultancy because she feels that being in charge of your own career and destiny is extremely empowering. It has enabled her to utilise the skills she gained in various roles to significantly improve standards of attainment for pupils who were previously under-attaining. These have consisted of teacher, lecturer, ITE tutor, examiner, senior leader, adviser and senior officer roles in three LAs. She is also a trained Ofsted inspector. The common denominator in all these roles has been her desire to work with teachers and senior leaders to improve educational outcomes for pupils with specific needs who, with additional support, can and do achieve highly. She is immensely privileged to have the opportunity to work closely with so many schools to achieve this goal. Sameena feels that much more work needs to be done to improve representation of female colleagues into senior leadership posts across all sectors of education and has a particular interest in ensuring that there is diversity in leadership.

MeeTwo: Teenage Mental Help, a safe social media solution

 

As ever more evidence emerges of the decline of teenage mental health governments and parents are increasingly turning to schools to provide front-line support. MeeTwo is a multi-award winning app that helps anxious teenagers talk about difficult things and get immediate support. It supported by the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) and being promoted by over 1,000 UK schools. In this talk we will introduce how MeeTwo works and examine the insights into youth mental health that we are discovering by listening to young people and observing how they help each other. We will explore the role that teachers can play to both reduce stress factors and help equip young people with the skills and tools needed to cope with anxiety. This talk is ideally suited to young people who want to learn more about youth mental health and MeeTwo as well as teachers who want to gain a better understanding of how to support their students.

Dr Kerstyn Comley

 

Dr Kerstyn Comley is an education technologist, volunteer teacher and co-CEO of MeeTwo Education which has created MeeTwo a multi-award winning app that provides teenagers with mental help. For the past two years MeeTwo has been named as one of the 100 most inspiring innovations in education in the world by HundrED.org. With over twenty years' experience in business, research & development, Kerstyn was named Rising Star in the Europe-wide Technology Playmaker awards 2018. In 2011, in response to a shortage in local secondary school places Kerstyn led a project to open a new Free secondary school in East London. Kerstyn continues to support the school as both a volunteer teacher and Chair of Governors.

Leading effective CPD 'evaluation' in your school

 

Effective continuous professional development (CPD) improves teaching and learning and has one of the largest impacts on student outcomes. (Hargreaves, 1994 and Craft 2000) However, teacher CPD evaluation is an often-neglected step because it is perceived by many as a challenging and time-consuming exercise¬, where historically little training and guidance has been given. However, to lead learning effectively in our schools we need to understand what is working well, and what may perhaps need a little more attention and tweaking. The same applies when it comes to the professional development we offer our teachers and staff.

CPD evaluation should be part of an overall self-evaluation that will enable schools to create an inclusive culture where teachers fully invest in their professional development through on-going reflection, as well as experiential practice and coaching that is informed by evidence. Developing a sophisticated approach to evaluating CPD in schools will enable our teachers and students to thrive.

Drawing on findings from my published paper – ‘What we know about evaluating the impact of continuous professional development (CPD)’ – the Teacher Development Trust and the work of CUREE, the session will outline some vital steps we can take to measure the impact of teacher CPD. We will highlight the purpose of evaluating teacher CPD and offer some dos and don’ts to get the right conversations started with colleagues. We will also refer to Thomas Guskey’s (2000) five levels of professional development as a framework for thinking about CPD evaluation.

Costa Constantinou

 

Costa is Veema Education’s driving force and has many years of experience both within the classroom and at leadership level. He understands first-hand the needs and priorities of schools today and has led national and international keynotes and workshops on improving teaching and learning, leadership in schools and implementing and managing effective change.

Costa passionately advocates that professional development is a requisite tool for teachers to engage with pedagogy, offer collaborative working partnerships, challenge and advance existing practice. Taken together these sharpen our ability to focus on how we teach and how pupils learn — a reflective approach that at its core sees learning through the eyes of the learner. This can clearly sharpen our ability to focus on how we teach and how pupils learn — whereby the ''why'' as well as the ‘What’ behind what might work is explored.

#10%braver. How @WomenEd resonated across the world

 

#WomenED began with a group of women drinking coffee after a twitter conversation and reactions to some blog posts about women in education leadership. Since, it has become international with over 22000 followers on twitter, mentioned in England’s Department of Education white paper and was voted Top 10 influencers in 2018 TES awards. This year, a @WomenEd book is to be has published called #10%braver.

The national leaders will be interviewed on a panel chaired by Jules Daulby, also a national leader, to talk about what impact #WomenEd has made and themes in their book.

Jules Daulby

 

Jules Daulby is a literacy and inclusion expert, podcaster of The Inclusive Classroom and co-founder and national leader of #WomenEd, a grassroots organisation created to support existing and aspiring women leaders. She started out her teaching career as an English and Drama teacher and until December, 2018 was Director of Education for literacy charity, Driver Youth Trust. Jules’ quest is to find a way to make classrooms inclusive and allow all children to thrive. She has a particular fascination with inclusive design of knowledge organisers, text books, worksheets and presentations. All her work is grounded in expert knowledge and experience of literacy and SEND in particularly dyslexia and ADHD. Jules believes that all behaviour is communication and accountability pressures can sometimes create environments where students with SEND are not valued. It is her ambition to persuade OFSTED to reward inclusion rather than exam results and push the DfE into making exams more accessible for young people who have speed of processing and memory difficulties. Jules is a prolific blogger and tweeter and co-founder and national leader for the grassroots organisation, #WomenEd created to support existing and aspiring women leaders.

Basic ingredients for great teaching

 

A lot works in education, but nothing works all of the time. In this session you’ll learn some basic ingredients for great teaching. But just like when you use salt and pepper in the kitchen, too much or too little can make a huge difference when working on feedback, metacognition, etc… This presentation is based on the new book with the same title.

Pedro de Bruckyere

 

Pedro De Bruyckere has been an educational scientist at Arteveldehogeschool in Ghent, Belgium, since 2001. He co-wrote several books on youth and education in Dutch and is an in-demand international public speaker on education. One of his strongest points is that Pedro is funny in explaining serious stuff. In 2015 Pedro co-wrote the popular book “Urban Myths about Learning and Education” with Paul Kirschner and Casper Hulshof. He is also an avid blogger on new research in education. Pedro gave highly appreciated talks at ResearchED London, Online Educa Berlin and other international conferences across Europe, including Sweden, Italy, Slovenia and the UK.

"Why nature conservation is a growing issue in the 21st century"

 

The talk features a variety of different ways of looking at how to tackle the current crisis of environment endangerment and wildlife protection. It also considers my own point of view and what i do to work towards conservation and it will look at easy steps that everyone can take to ensure that our world lasts an extra 100 years.

Aryaman, Student at Institut Le Rosey

 

Aryaman is a grade 11 student at Institut Le Rosey, Switzerland, with a deep interest in wildlife since early childhood. In 2017, he launched ‘Little Planet Foundation’ (www.littleplanetfoundation.org), a non-profit initiative to promote wildlife and nature conservation. Since then approximately 2,400 volunteers have signed up with this foundation. In October 2017, Aryaman held his maiden wildlife photography exhibition in Mumbai thereby generating around US$20,000 for the foundation from the sale of his photographs.

Awarded Le Rosey's Honour Award for Highest Achievement in Grade 9 & 10, Aryaman was elected to Rosey Student’s Council in February 2018. He won the Best New Delegate at Model United Nations (MUN) at Budapest in 2017 as part of Le Rosey MUN Club. Academically inclined towards Physics and Mathematics, he was selected for a Satellite building project at Rosey, in collaboration with CERN & Cambridge University, involving designing, building & programming a satellite (ESAT) that will go into space to record maximum deforestation on earth.

Aryaman’s other interests include football, skiing, diving and playing the guitar.

Making Kids Cleverer

 

An exploration of how and why we should go about raising children’s intelligence.

David Didau

 

David Didau is the author of several books on education and is a prominent - and often provocative - blogger and commentator on social media. He has worked as both a teacher and teacher educator and now leads training and consults in both the state and independent sectors, both in the UK and across the the world. Currently he is leading the design and implementation of a new curriculum for a multi-academy trust. His latest book is entitled, Making Kids Clever: A manifesto for closing the advantage gap.

*Session delivered in French.

Expanding experience beyond reality

 

A central concern in corporate training is that the training provided to employees actually leads to an increase of productivity and/or work satisfaction. An intrinsic feature of human cognition is indeed the difficulty to transfer to a context Y a skill that has been learned in context X. One solution is to train that skills across multiple contexts X1, X2, X3,… but this is time consuming. A second approach is to avoid transfer, i.e. to train employees in a context that is as similar as possible to the target context, but this does not fly if the same session employees brings together employees from very different departments of the company. A third approach that underlies our REALTO platform is to capture experience at the workplace through various means (pictures, videos, documents) and feed the training sessions with this authentic material. If the participants come from various departments, these various contexts will hence be present during the training sessions. REALTO looks hence more like a social network than like a learning management system. We recently went one step further: augmented reality enables your employees to explore contexts that they did not encounter in reality. We don’t only capture and exploit experience but we expand this experience beyond reality. My videos will make this smoky statement more concrete.

Pierre Dillenbourg

 

A former teacher in elementary school, Pierre Dillenbourg graduated in educational science (University of Mons, Belgium). He started his research on learning technologies in 1984. He obtained a PhD in computer science from the University of Lancaster (UK), in the domain of artificial intelligence applications for education. He has been assistant professor at the University of Geneva. He joined EPFL in 2002. He has been the academic director of Center for Digital Education, which implements the MOOC strategy of EPFL (over 2 million registrations). He is a full professor in learning technologies in the School of Computer & Communication Sciences, where he is the head of the CHILI Lab: "Computer-Human Interaction for Learning & Instruction ». He is the director of the leading house DUAL-T, which develops technologies for dual vocational education systems (carpenters, florists,...). With EPFL colleagues, he launched in 2017 the Swiss EdTech Collider, an incubator with +75 start-ups in learning technologies In 2018, he co-founded LEARN, the EPFL Center of Learning Sciences that brings together the local initiatives in educational innovation.

Coaching to improve learning

 

Aiglon has redesigned our approach towards our professional relationships and how we review our impact on student learning by breaking apart traditional lines of appraisal and focusing on a coaching model that fosters and improves personal and professional development. Moving away from formal lesson observations and, supported by research on the importance of incremental change driven by self-evaluation, we are trying to open the doors to our classrooms and allow more opportunities for peer learning and coaching.

Tomas Duckling

 

Tomas Duckling is Assistant-Deputy Head (Curriculum) of Aiglon College, a TOK, History and Psychology teacher who is passionate about improving student learning. He has worked at Aiglon for two years and before that spent four years in Brunei with his wife Katherine. He is TOK teacher, examiner, and involved in the 2020 Curriculum committee and the next Cambridge textbook.

Developing 21st-century Skills within a 20th-century Curriculum

 

Panel with Katrina Edmunds, Laura Kaub, Elisabeth Marksteiner, Floyd Woodrow, Shabana Basij-Rasikh and Stuart Grieve.

Incredibly, we're already nearly two decades into the 21st Century. So-called '21st-Century skills' are no longer a thing of the future - they're needed by today's students! Yet most of the world's education systems have not adapted to meet this need. Panelists in this session will draw on their experiences in British education, international schools in Switzerland, and Nova Pioneer Schools in Kenya and South Africa and SOLA in Afghanistan to discuss how they are working to ensure that their students develop 21st-century skills.

Katrina Edmunds

 

Katrina is an experienced international university counsellor who is focused on empowering young people to make the most of their present and future. She was formerly Assistant Director of the International Office at the University of Edinburgh where she worked for a decade, managing global recruitment and study abroad; for Europe, North America and Asia. She holds an undergraduate degree from UCL and a PGDip in the Management of International Higher Education. She has completed advanced counsellor training with College Board in New York and with Oxford and Cambridge via counsellor workshops. She is a member of the following professional associations: International ACAC, CIS and is a frequent presenter at their conferences as well as UCAS International. Passionate about travelling she spent two years travelling and teaching English in France and Vietnam, thus is fairly multi-lingual for a Scot, speaking English, French, Spanish, and a little Italian as well as Vietnamese. Her travels and studies have taught her a lot but as a sports enthusiast (rowing, triathlon, yoga, skiing) and mother of twins, she draws on her outside interests in high performance, positive psychology, parenting, study skills and leadership to enhance her counselling.

#10%braver. How @WomenEd resonated across the world

 

#WomenED began with a group of women drinking coffee after a twitter conversation and reactions to some blog posts about women in education leadership. Since, it has become international with over 22000 followers on twitter, mentioned in England’s Department of Education white paper and was voted Top 10 influencers in 2018 TES awards. This year, a @WomenEd book is to be has published called #10%braver.

The national leaders will be interviewed on a panel chaired by Jules Daulby, also a national leader, to talk about what impact #WomenEd has made and themes in their book.

Keziah Featherstone

 

Co-founder and National Leader of #WomenEd, co-editor of 10% Braver and member of non-political think tank the Headteachers’ Roundtable, Keziah is current Head at Q3 Academy Tipton, a large urban multi-cultural comprehensive school in the Black Country. Originally an English teacher, she has twenty-five years of experience in education and does a little writing on the side. She is fully committed to high quality inclusive education for all, value-driven leadership and simply getting stuff done.

#WomenEd Session 3: Global perspectives: social, moral and economic imperatives for leadership with Liz Free and Vivienne Porritt

 

Come and talk about building our global network that is making a difference for women leaders in education.

Across OECD member countries, 68% of teachers are women but 49% of principals in lower secondary education are women and ‘more can and should be done to decrease other sources of potential bias or barriers to female leadership.’(OECD, 2015). Some countries are struggling to educate their young people, while also anticipating substantial growth. This has significant global consequences as we underutilise the very workforce that we desperately need to educate the growing world population. Women are two thirds of our global profession: women are crucial to the national and international conversation needed to rethink education to meet the growing moral, social and economic challenges that we face. From this dynamic resource, we can develop a global strategy led by incredible and visible pioneers for women leading education.

Liz Free

 

Liz Free has been a teacher and head teacher in some of the world’s leading schools and is now a globally recognised leader of education talent, continuing professional development and learning (CPDL) services. Liz is the founding Director of the International Leadership Academy, the British School in the Netherlands, Co-founder @WomenEd Netherlands and lead for #WomenEd Europe, Founding Fellow of the Chartered College of Teaching and recently authored ‘The Parents’ Guide to Primary Schools’ series and the soon to be published ‘International Perspectives’ chapter in the upcoming #WomenEd book, '10% Braver: Inspiring Women to Lead Education' by Sage.

Construire la confiance dans une communauté éducative

 

Chaque membre d’un établissement scolaire est responsable de la construction de sa communauté (parents, enseignants, administration, personnel). Une équipe éducative gagne à prendre du temps à la maintenance de son groupe. Travailler en équipe permet de grandes joies et offre de nombreuses opportunités de tensions. La confiance est un ingrédient nécessaire pour une communauté solide. Plus nous prenons soin de la communauté, plus l'impact sur l'enseignement et le sentiment de sécurité des élèves est important. Les compétences académiques et le climat scolaire s’en trouveront augmenté. Au cours de cette conférence, vous explorerez quelques façons de travailler sur la confiance par le biais de quelques activités vivantes et interactives :
- Gérer les désaccords
- Explorer l'art subtil de l'encouragement

A travers la démarche de Discipline Positive, vous découvrirez quelques façons de renforcer votre communauté éducative.

Nadine Gaudin

 

Nadine Gaudin est Maître Formatrice qualifiée en Discipline Positive (école, parent, petite enfance, entreprise). Elle a été enseignante pendant 15 ans. Elle forme maintenant inspecteurs, chefs d’établissement, conseils de direction, enseignants (de tous les niveaux), managers, facilitateurs et formateurs (plus de 1000 personnes par an). Elle travaille avec les régions/cantons en France et en Suisse dans des projets d’envergure. Elle voyage à travers le monde (Europe, Afrique, Moyen-Orient, Canada) dans tous types d'écoles pour développer la Discipline Positive. Elle anime aujourd'hui une formation pour Sciences Po destinée aux cadres et dirigeants. Elle a travaillé avec de nombreuses équipes de direction et les a aidées à mettre en œuvre la Discipline Positive dans leur structure sur le long terme. Elle a participé à l'UNESCO à un groupe de travail pour la prévention de l'extrémisme violent. Son projet avec l'Académie d'Amiens (aujourd’hui une priorité académique) a été présenté à l'OCDE. Elle a siégé au bureau de la Positive Discipline Association à titre de directrice et de coprésidente au cours des trois dernières années. Elle a également fait partie du bureau de l'Association française. Elle encadre activement de nombreux formateurs de Discipline Positive par le biais de formations, d'ateliers et de coaching individuel.

Developing 21st-century Skills within a 20th-century Curriculum

 

Panel with Katrina Edmunds, Laura Kaub, Elisabeth Marksteiner, Floyd Woodrow, Shabana Basij-Rasikh and Stuart Grieve.

Incredibly, we're already nearly two decades into the 21st Century. So-called '21st-Century skills' are no longer a thing of the future - they're needed by today's students! Yet most of the world's education systems have not adapted to meet this need. Panelists in this session will draw on their experiences in British education, international schools in Switzerland, and Nova Pioneer Schools in Kenya and South Africa and SOLA in Afghanistan to discuss how they are working to ensure that their students develop 21st-century skills.

Stuart Grieve

 

Stuart Grieve is a sport and youth development consultant with experience working with organisations across a wide range of sport, education and community sectors. Stuart is passionate about the development of young people and believes sport can be a fantastic vehicle to help young people to believe in their ability to improve and learn skills and values that they can use in all areas of life.

He has previously worked with the Scottish Football Association and Sport Scotland to develop positive environments in sport and has also worked with the Winning Scotland Foundation to develop a national programme of 'Growth Mindset' in education in Scotland.

He is a football coach and coach developer with experience of coaching within grassroots, community, academy and university football clubs.
Stuart currently works as a consultant with UEFA and also supports schools in Switzerland and abroad with life skills and mindset educational workshops and programmes.

Philippe Gudin

 

A graduate in Mathematics and Economics, Philippe Gudin has devoted his life to education. As the Director of Le Rosey, he raised the finest Swiss Internat to the ranks of the leading British and American boarding schools. His innovations have focused on the internationalisation of education, the development of all students’ talents or “intelligences”, bilingualism, and the place of the arts and culture in education. A creator of Camps and “Schools Without Walls”, he has introduced programmes focused on personal development and ecology, as well as humanitarian and cultural activities. His work on Humanitarian initiatives most notably includes the opening of a school for 1500 pupils in Bamako in Mali. He has also worked to save failing schools. An active member of various foundations, his primary objective has been to set up effective and sustainable educational projects. He has written a number of articles on international education and two books: Actis Virtus (2005) and The Arts at the Service of Education (2015). He also acts as educational consultant for a number of public and private institutions.

"What are the competences young people need for them and for humanity to thrive?"

 

At the International School of Geneva, the world’s oldest international school, we defined international education in the 20th century by developing the International Baccalaureate Diploma. We aim to do the same in the 21st century. We cannot do this alone. We are partnering with UNESCO’s International Bureau of Education in exploring this question of what habits of mind, heart and action are essential for the common good and to the lives our students are likely to lead. This interactive session will include a presentation on the “stable macro-competences” we are aiming for all of our students to develop and will discuss how we think this might best accomplished. We will also share how we are exploring different ways for students to demonstrate their character, their passions, what they know and are able to do by developing their own universal learner passport. In this way they take greater control of their learning, development and destiny rather than surrendering themselves to being described by a single number.

Dr David Hawley

 

Dr David Hawley took up his post as Director General of the International School of Geneva in August 2017.

Dr Hawley holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology and Earth Sciences from Framingham State University, and a Master of Education in Educational Technology and a Doctorate of Education in Administration, Planning and Social Policy from Harvard University.

Dr Hawley began his career in 1978 as a Director at the Framingham YMCA Outdoor Centre. In 1979, he became a Teacher of Science and Science Department Head at The American School of Guatemala before he joined Scituate High School as a Teacher of Science and International Student Advisor in 1980. In 1981, he was appointed Teacher of Science and Assistant Administrator at the Colegio International de Caracas before he became an Education Technology Specialist at Data General Corporation in 1984. In 1986, he was appointed Acting Director, and Middle and High School Principal at Lincoln School, Costa Rica before he joined Harvard Cambridge as Freshman Proctor and Resident Academic Advisor in 1989 and Frankfurt International School as High School Principal in 1991. In 1996, Dr Hawley became Head at Atlanta International School and then joined Lester B. Pearson United World College of the Pacific as Head in 2006. In 2015, he was appointed Chief Academic Officer at International Baccalaureate until 2017 when he joined the International School of Geneva.

Excellence - finding yourself - the I in identity

 

In today’s cluttered world of homework, social networks, peer-pressure, and family, it is hard for teenagers to carve out time for self-discovery, to determine their own identity. It is important for teachers, mentors, and parents to give the opportunities and examples to develop what Elisabeth and Tiffany refer to as the “I” factor. The “I” in the student’s identity, unique, their creative, curious, critical thought pattern which stimulates him/her to pursue an interest, to dig into a topic, make leaps of imagination and academic connections. Elisabeth and Tiffany have researched what occurs in schools and at home to develop excellence, self-actualisation and cultivate this “I” factor. They believe that it is often the “I” factor which is missing from an excellent application. They present how to understand universities and courses beyond rankings, to develop the “I” factor, and how to match the two. They examine how to advocate for “I”.

Tiffany Jolowicz

 

Tiffany Jolowicz graduated from the European Business School and proceeded to a career trading Government Bonds in London and Amsterdam. Leaving the Netherlands, she moved to the USA, Spain & Switzerland, where she raised 5 children (SOAS, Cambridge, Durham & Oxford, one still 15.) During this period she wrote “How to enjoy your first baby as if it were your fifth” In 1993, she ran her first half marathon and over a period of 25 years, trained and advanced to completing two Ironman triathlons. Fascinated by what motivates women to take on long distance endurance challenges, she worked with 40 other female Ironman finishers and compiled the book “Ironwomen,” (an inspiring insight into why and how women do long distance triathlons.) She is currently working on her first novel and is training for the Chicago Marathon 2018. She is collaborating with Elisabeth on a book on Oxford and Cambridge applications. Having worked with her four children on university applications, jointly they have received offers from over 20 universities, including four interviews at Oxford and Cambridge, resulting in 3 offers. Tiffany is researching how parents and/or mentors can enable students to achieve their potential and make excellent university applications.

Developing 21st-century Skills within a 20th-century Curriculum

 

Panel with Katrina Edmunds, Laura Kaub, Elisabeth Marksteiner, Floyd Woodrow, Shabana Basij-Rasikh and Stuart Grieve.

Incredibly, we're already nearly two decades into the 21st Century. So-called '21st-Century skills' are no longer a thing of the future - they're needed by today's students! Yet most of the world's education systems have not adapted to meet this need. Panelists in this session will draw on their experiences in British education, international schools in Switzerland, and Nova Pioneer Schools in Kenya and South Africa and SOLA in Afghanistan to discuss how they are working to ensure that their students develop 21st-century skills.

Laura Kaub

 

Laura Kaub has over a decade of experience in helping young African leaders gain access to and succeed in tertiary education in the United States and around the world. She worked as an international admissions officer at Barnard College, a highly-selective liberal arts college located in the United States, and as the founding director of African Leadership Academy (ALA)’s university guidance program. Later, she served as the founding director of the MasterCard Foundation Scholarship Program at ALA and as manager of the Yale Young African Scholars (YYAS) program, a free university access initiative that introduces African secondary school students to opportunities for admission and financial aid both on the continent and off. Ms. Kaub recently joined Nova Pioneer Schools for Innovators and Leaders as their inaugural director of post-school success where she oversees personal and pre-university development of students across Nova Pioneer’s three secondary schools.

Ms. Kaub is a member of the International Association of College Admissions Counsellors and serves on that organisation’s Inclusion, Access and Success Committee and its Ad-hoc Committee on Standardised Testing. She also sits on African Leadership Academy’s U.S. Advisory Council and is Chair of the HALI Access Network, an association of schools and organisations working with high-achieving, low-income African students who wish to pursue tertiary education abroad.

The right times for students to learn, teachers to teach and everyone getting enough sleep

 

What are the best times to learn, teach and sleep? This session will bring you up to date with the new science and best answers. Every second of every day people are controlled by their biology, nor our school clocks and mobile phones. The discoveries in science in the last fifty years have now shown every main function of our bodies are determined by our genes, age and sex. Even more surprising, we’re all different timekeepers. This year thousand of people have been learning when they are at their best. Even before you get here, if you want to find out about yourself take the survey at https://nquire.org.uk/mission/chronotype/contribute and get immediate feedback. And learn about the best times for students too.
Paul Kelley (speaker) and Sian Griffiths (The Sunday Times education editor): Body Clocks: The biology of time for sleep, education and work.

Dr Paul Kelley

 

Dr Paul Kelley spent 40 years as a full-time secondary teacher and headteacher in challenging state schools in the North of England. He has also run a large nursery, briefly taught in primary schools, taught for The Open University (who awarded him an honorary degree in 2007). He has helped change education law in the UK and US, worked for European research projects, the BBC, Microsoft and others. For the last 20 years he has worked on Building Schools for the Future, completing his exemplar building in 2009. More recently his academic research has been about school times (a good start is this study). He also writes occasionally for The Guardian, and has been a researcher at Oxford and The Open University. He is married to Linda, a deputy headteacher in a very successful school, and they have four children.

Don’ts and Dos in Education: Seven Myths and What Research Says About Them

 

Mark Twain once said that “In religion and politics, people's beliefs and convictions are in almost every case gotten at second hand and without examination”. Unfortunately this is also true in present day education; even in teacher education and teacher training. Educational technologists, educational reformers, instructional designers, local and federal politicians, teachers, school managers, and advisory groups are all jockeying to show how innovative and up to date they can be, based not upon good science but rather upon commonly held but often unproven and/or untrue beliefs.

And what is the root of all of this? The reforms that we often see are most often not based on good science (and specifically the cognitive and psychological sciences) and/or good scientific research, but rather upon beliefs, plausible sounding rationale and/or arguments, poorly designed research.

Paul A. Kirschner will look at a number of these urban legends from the perspective of what cognitive science and good research in the field has to say about them.

Paul A. Kirschner

Paul A. Kirschner (1951) is Distinguished University Professor and professor of Educational Psychology at the Open University of the Netherlands as well as Visiting Professor of Education with a special emphasis on Learning and Interaction in Teacher Education at the University of Oulu, Finland where he was also honoured with an Honorary Doctorate (doctor honoris causa).

He was previously professor of Educational Psychology and Programme Director of the Fostering Effective, Efficient and Enjoyable Learning environments (FEEEL) programme at the Welten Institute, Research Centre for Learning, Teaching and Technology at the Open University of the Netherlands. He is an internationally recognised expert in the fields of educational psychology and instructional design.

He is Research Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Science. He was President of the International Society for the Learning Sciences (ISLS) in 2010-2011, member of both the ISLS CSCL Board and the Executive Committee of the Society and he is an AERA Research Fellow (the first European to receive this honour).

He is currently a member of the Scientific Technical Council of the Foundation for University Computing Facilities (SURF WTR) in the Netherlands and was a member of the Dutch Educational Council and, as such, was advisor to the Minister of Education (2000-2004). He is chief editor of the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, commissioning editor of Computers in Human Behavior, and has published two very successful books: Ten Steps to Complex Learning (now in its third revised edition and translated/published in Korea and China) and Urban Legends about Learning and Education (also in Dutch, Swedish, and Chinese). He also co-edited two other books (Visualizing Argumentation and What we know about CSCL). His areas of expertise include instructional design, interaction in learning, collaboration for learning (computer supported collaborative learning), and regulation of learning.

 

The power of second chances: A conversation between Alvin Carpio (former pupil) and Kim Kovacevic (former teacher)

 

Alvin Carpio currently runs United Citizens, a global movement committed to shaping the fourth industrial revolution for all, leaving nobody behind. Hear him speak with his former teacher, Kim Kovacevic, who once nearly banned him from participating in a mock election at school before giving him a second chance. That mock election gave Alvin his first experience of political campaigning. He has since gone on to campaign on issues of social justice and human rights, and to advise governments and multinational corporations. In 2017 he was listed on Forbes 30 Under 30 for his work in law and policy.

Kim Kovacevic

 

Kim Kovacevic is a teacher of History with 23 years’ experience. He previously worked at The London Oratory School in London and is currently Academic Dean at Institut Le Rosey. He is looking forward to more exciting challenges next year as he assumes the post of Academic Head of School.

#10%braver. How @WomenEd resonated across the world

 

#WomenED began with a group of women drinking coffee after a twitter conversation and reactions to some blog posts about women in education leadership. Since, it has become international with over 22000 followers on twitter, mentioned in England’s Department of Education white paper and was voted Top 10 influencers in 2018 TES awards. This year, a @WomenEd book is to be has published called #10%braver.

The national leaders will be interviewed on a panel chaired by Jules Daulby, also a national leader, to talk about what impact #WomenEd has made and themes in their book.

Alison Kriel

 

Alison was born in Cape Town, South Africa during the apartheid regime. She had teenage parents who worked hard to provide for their children despite the challenges of political oppression and financial hardship. The family lived in a range of countries before settling in England when Alison was 15.

After gaining a B.Ed Hons at University of North London, Alison chose to teach in inner city schools, working mainly in Hackney. She was awarded Doctor of Philosophy Honoris Causa for attainment and services to education in 2018.

Alison is an experienced Head Teacher with a demonstrated history of high attainment working within the education management industry. She has a passion for values led leadership, staff and pupil wellbeing, the celebration of the teaching profession, inclusion and diversity and she enjoys supporting school leaders and schools facing demanding challenges.

Alison’s first headship was to set up a new primary school which grew from 75 – 470 pupils. It was quickly established as a high performing, oversubscribed school. Her second headship turned around a failing school within a deprived area of London from the bottom 1% to the top 0.1% in 3 years and went on to sustain the success of the school for a further 6 years with the school consistently being listed within the top 100 schools nationwide. The school was regarded and recommended by Regional Schools Commissioner for East of England and North-East London as a model school for the London, Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire and Essex region. She managed the transition of a school to becoming an Academy. The school won many prestigious awards including Gold School Status, SSAT Award winner for Attainment and Pupil Progress, National Pupil Premium Award winner. Both schools are listed in the Sunday Times Top 500.

Alison’s excellence in leadership was consistently recognised in every Ofsted Inspection.

Alison is a regular speaker and panel member at conferences speaking on a wide variety of subjects including Courageous Leadership, Turnaround Schools, Wellbeing, Staff Retention, Breaking Through The Glass Ceiling and Diversity.

Alison is an Independent Education Consultant and is currently setting up Above and Beyond, a platform to change the conversation about education providing a place for schools to share their best practice and connect educators who want to form collaborative partnerships
Alison is a National Leader of #WomenEd, a HundrEd Ambassador and a RSA Fellow.

Supporting Students To Become Successful Self-Regulated Learners

 

How can students become successful self-regulated learners? I propose that this question can be seen in analogy to problem-solving. In Cognitive Psychology the main components of a problem are initial state, obstacles, and goal; plus, a range of allowed moves to overcome the obstacles and reach the goal. I will discuss common obstacles in becoming a successful self-regulated student and provide an overview of potential tools that can help overcoming them. I will introduce a multi-faceted approach – drawing from research in learning, memory, and motivation – to achieve a better understanding of what it means to be a successful self-regulated learner and explore ways on how educators can support students on this journey.

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel

 

Dr Carolina Kuepper-Tetzel is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Dundee, UK, an expert in applying findings from Cognitive Science to education, and an enthusiastic science communicator. She obtained her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Mannheim and pursued postdoc positions at York University in Toronto and the Center for Integrative Research in Cognition, Learning, and Education (CIRCLE) at Washington University in St. Louis.

Her expertise focuses on learning and memory phenomena that allow implementation to educational settings to offer teachers and students a wide range of strategies that promote long-term retention. Carolina is convinced that psychological research should serve the public and, to that end, engages heavily in scholarly outreach and science communication. She is a member of the Learning Scientists and founded the Teaching Innovation & Learning Enhancement (TILE) network. TILE brings different disciplines and sectors together to discuss how to overcome prevailing issues in education with research-based approaches. Carolina is passionate about teaching and aims at providing her students with the best learning experience possible.

In her free time, Carolina enjoys going on family trips to explore the beauty of Scotland, listening to her vinyl records, reading books, or watching movies and series.

Excellence - finding yourself - the I in identity

 

In today’s cluttered world of homework, social networks, peer-pressure, and family, it is hard for teenagers to carve out time for self-discovery, to determine their own identity. It is important for teachers, mentors, and parents to give the opportunities and examples to develop what Elisabeth and Tiffany refer to as the “I” factor. The “I” in the student’s identity, unique, their creative, curious, critical thought pattern which stimulates him/her to pursue an interest, to dig into a topic, make leaps of imagination and academic connections. Elisabeth and Tiffany have researched what occurs in schools and at home to develop excellence, self-actualisation and cultivate this “I” factor. They believe that it is often the “I” factor which is missing from an excellent application. They present how to understand universities and courses beyond rankings, to develop the “I” factor, and how to match the two. They examine how to advocate for “I”.

Elisabeth Marksteiner

 

Elisabeth Marksteiner graduated from Clare College Cambridge in 1988 with a degree in English and then trained as a teacher. Following two years in the UK, she came to Switzerland and taught at the Riverside School. Subsequently gaining an MBA, and leaving teaching, she returned to Riverside to focus on world-wide college counselling. She has always been intrigued by individuals and excellence; what is it that influences one student and not another? A compulsive reader, she’s returned to Cambridge and is writing a book on Oxford and Cambridge admissions. She is on the board of the International Association for College Admission Counseling.

Mindfulness & Mindset

 

Have you ever asked yourself these questions, “why are students not interested in learning anymore?”. “Aren’t they supposed to be curious about new things?” “What if we, as teachers, possess the key to the truth?” We are the ones who open the gate of knowledge to our students. Can you imagine how powerful it is that we HAVE to change our students’ lives?

The goal of this session is not only to build up the school’s growth-mindset but also to encourage teachers to practise mindfulness. I am convinced that practising mindfulness helps us to be more aware of our own emotional state and the emotional climate of the classroom. As caring givers, we need to cultivate our awareness and sensitivity when facing students’ learning obstacles.

What we do and what we say to our students in the classroom has a tremendous impact on them. Therefore, having a growth-mindset towards ourselves and our students is extremely important. Successful learning means thoughtful teaching. There is a strong connection between students and teachers. From NOW, let’s have a MINDFUL teaching environment!

Shu Ling Stephanie Lin Mayor

 

Stephanie is a passionate teacher with a great appetite for continuously learning in the field of brain, mind and their relationships. She got her Master Degree in Applied Linguistics in New South Wales University in Sydney. She has been trained as an NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming) practitioner and a life coach. As a matter of fact, she is engaged in several approaches in order to better understand the learning process - such as teaching in a bilingual school in Taiwan; training teacher in various schools by using drama into the curriculum. She is convinced that learning can be fun and joyful. This idea drove her to establish a Bilingual Drama School in Taiwan later after several years’ teaching experience and experimentation. She believes that through theatre activities, students are stimulated to open their learning channels (VAKOF) and therefore, the creativities are fostered. She is also a co-founder of the Cultural Centre in Geneva. The purpose of this non-profit association is not only to promote Taiwanese and Chinese culture by learning Mandarin but also to build a bridge between Eastern and Western culture.

As a long-term meditation practitioner, she strongly believes that mindful awareness can change the functional structure of our brain. Through the integration of mind, brain and heart, we can grow the fibres in our brain, then our mind becomes resilient and coherent. Furthermore, the relationships within ourselves and with the others become loving, compassion and empathetic.

A City's Schools Transformed?

 

Little more than a decade ago, London's schools were viewed as deeply problematic, if not a dangerous basket case. But no more. What changed, and, what can other, complex, diverse cities learn from the London's success? Drawing on his personal experience working in the UK capital, as well as an ever growing body of (often contradictory) research, Loic Menzies unpicks the myths and shines a light on a mix of unexpected and interrelated factors that explain one of the great success stories of global education.

Loic Menzies

 

Loic Menzies is Chief Executive of the UK's education and youth 'think and action-tank' LKMco. He has worked in education research and policy for the last ten years. Before that he was a teacher a youth worker as well as a tutor in the Faculty of Education at Canterbury Christ Church University.

Loic's passion for the education and youth sector began whilst working on community youth projects in Cambridge as a teenager. His belief that society should do more to support young people's transition to adulthood then drove him into schools, where he joined the senior leadership team of a highly challenging school in North West London. During his time there, the school overcame its turbulent history and became the country's fifth most improved school.

Since leaving teaching Loic has authored numerous high profile reports on issues ranging from youth homelessness to teacher recruitment, all based on detailed qualitative and quantitative research. He works closely with practitioners and policy makers to communicate research’s implications, for example, by presenting to the UK Parliament's Education Select Committee and making a number of high profile media appearances. He is currently editing LKMco’s first book for Routledge entitled, Young People on the Margins.

How to use news in the classroom

 

WORKSHOP: a session to explore how to use news in the classroom, hosted by The New York Times in Education, exclusive international media partner for the festival.

Raphael Minder

 

Raphael Minder has been based in Madrid as the Spain and Portugal correspondent for The New York Times since April 2010. He has written extensively on the financial crisis’ impact on Spain and Portugal and the resulting political tensions, including the secessionist drive in Catalonia. He has also covered social issues, like illegal migration and domestic violence in Spain, and writes about sports and culture, including the rivalry between Real Madrid and F.C. Barcelona and efforts to complete Gaudí’s Sagrada Família.

Born in Geneva in 1971, Raphael has been a full-time journalist since 1993, when he started working in Switzerland for Bloomberg News. He spent 10 years as a staff correspondent for the Financial Times, working in Paris, Brussels, Sydney and finally Hong Kong as the F.T.’s Asia regional correspondent.

Slim fat paradox

 

Human evolution comprises many major and minor episodes that have shaped its development. These include phases when men were hunters and gatherers, later farmers and most recently individuals able to control machines and mechanising work in the vortex of industrial revolution. Let’s ask ourselves a simple question: What was and is man actually adapted to? When we look at human evolutionary process, it is interesting to note that we currently gravely disrespect the way our bodies have been forming for thousands of years. One of the current problems of the evolutionary mismatch, which is associated with serious health risks and which, unfortunately, is not evident at first sight, is the so-called slim fat paradox – an oxymoron that could be loosely explained as a lean fatty and which would probably make our ancient ancestors laugh heartily as it is totally improbable.

Martin Musálek Dr.

 

Martin Musálek is Assistant professor at the Department of Kinanthropology and Humanities, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University, Prague, the Czech Republic.
I teach courses on Motor Development, Kinanthropometry and Methodology from bachelor to PhD level. In the area of Motor Development and Kinanthropometry (the relation between function and anthropometry parameters), I am specialized in child populations from pre-school age to adolescence. Currently, I focus on two research topics. Firstly, I study the motor and physical development of pre-school and middle-school-aged children in an international context. I collaborate with several European universities (e.g. Freiburg, Ankara, Moscow State University, Potsdam) as well as universities outside Europe (e.g. Stellenbosch, Health Sciences University of Mongolia). My second research topic is focused on the sport environment, where I deal with the questions of development of physical and somatic dispositions of athletes in the of middle-age-school and puberty age categories with respect to their biological age. I publish the results of my research work in international journals and I regularly give lectures at international symposia on motor activities, paediatrics, sport science and physical performance.

#WomenEd Session 3: Global perspectives: social, moral and economic imperatives for leadership with Liz Free and Vivienne Porritt

 

Come and talk about building our global network that is making a difference for women leaders in education.

Across OECD member countries, 68% of teachers are women but 49% of principals in lower secondary education are women and ‘more can and should be done to decrease other sources of potential bias or barriers to female leadership.’(OECD, 2015). Some countries are struggling to educate their young people, while also anticipating substantial growth. This has significant global consequences as we underutilise the very workforce that we desperately need to educate the growing world population. Women are two thirds of our global profession: women are crucial to the national and international conversation needed to rethink education to meet the growing moral, social and economic challenges that we face. From this dynamic resource, we can develop a global strategy led by incredible and visible pioneers for women leading education.

Vivienne Porritt

 

Co-founder, National Leader and Chair of #WomenEd and co-editor of 10% Braver: Inspiring Women to Lead Education, Vivienne works with school leaders on impact evaluation, vision, strategy and professional learning and development, as well as women’s leadership. Vivienne is a former secondary headteacher, Director for School Partnerships at UCL Institute of Education and a Chair of Governors in inner London. Joyously, Vivienne is the co-editor of 10% Braver: Inspiring Women to Lead Education.

The motivational pull of teaching languages through storytelling

 

Would you prefer to "Motivate" rather than "Laminate"? This session explores both my own qualitative research and evidence from around the world about why Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling (TPRS) is so motivating for both students and teachers. Practical examples and strategies of how to get started with 'teaching through storytelling' will also be presented.

Liam Printer

 

Liam Printer is an author, consultant, and researcher on 'Motivation' and 'Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling (TPRS)'. He is also a passionate language teacher with 12 years teaching experience and currently works as a Spanish teacher and 'Approaches to Learning Coordinator' at The International School of Lausanne in Switzerland. He speaks Gaelic Irish, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese and German. After winning the first place prize in his undergraduate degree from Dublin City University, Liam was then awarded a scholarship on the Postgraduate Diploma in Education and Languages from the University of Limerick. Liam graduated top of his class of over 140 students with a first class honours, including the highest possible grade for teaching. Liam is currently completing a Doctorate of Education (Ed.D) through the University of Bath, focusing on the motivational pull of teaching languages through storytelling, specifically relating to the ‘Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling’ (TPRS) approach. Liam's research in this field was recently published in world renowned "Language Learning Journal". Liam was invited as a speaker and presenter to the 2019 ECIS Multilingual Conference, the 2018 TPRS Europe Conference in France and has also presented at The Alliance for International Education conference in The Netherlands and the FEILTE, Irish Teaching Council Conference in Dublin. He is also an educational consultant on 'language learning strategies' for the Lapeenranta municipality in Finland and has trained many teachers in Switzerland in the methods of TPRS and Comprehensible Input teaching. Outside of teaching, Liam's other two passions are basketball and snowboarding. He coached the Senior Girls Basketball team at his current school to European Schools Conference champions in 2016 and 2017 and worked as a snowboard instructor all over the world between 2008 and 2012. In 2010, Liam became the Irish National Snowboard Champion after winning 2 gold medals at the Irish National Ski and Snowboard Championships in the French Alps.

Educating Adolescents in the 21st Century, The New Codes

 

After the baby-boomers, then X generation, a new generation of adolescents pervades our landscape and upset the relations parents children, student teachers and patients caregivers.

The 10-25 years old require the previous generations to compose differently. They invent new ways to behave in group with the reactions that disturb adults. New ways of feeding, drinking ("binge drinking'), to manage love relationship, stimulate college playground and to display in the street. Without forgetting a particular interest for the virtual, with their own image of course to the center of all concerns.

Teaching young people implies to be sensitised to these new codes: to establish an educational alliance not always won in advance, and especially to better understand the fantastic issues of this period of life, reread through the twenty-first century prism.

Dr. Olivier Revol

 

Le Dr Olivier Revol, 60 ans, est l'auteur de nombreuses publications scientifiques, concernant la précocité intellectuelle, l'hyperactivité et les difficultés scolaires.
Il dirige un service de Neuro-psychiatrie de l’enfant au CHU de Lyon. Il enseigne à l’université Lyon 1 et milite depuis 30 ans pour que chaque enfant, quelles que soient ses compétences, découvre à l'école le plaisir d'apprendre. Il a publié trois ouvrages chez JC Lattès : "Même pas grave! L'échec scolaire ça se soigne" en 2006, « J’ai un ado, mais je me soigne.. » en 2010, et « On se calme » en 2013. Il a co-écrit en 2015 « 100 idées pour accompagner les enfants à Haut Potentiel (Tom Pousse), et en 2019 « Les Philocognitifs » chez Odile Jacob.

Il aide actuellement les parents et les professionnels à comprendre les nouveaux codes des enfants et des adolescents, avec un intérêt particulier pour les fratries d’enfants différents.

Jan Rihak

 

Classtime is a fun and easy to use solution for teachers that helps them fully engage their students, giving them immediate transparency on learning progress, and saving them substantial amounts of time. 30’000+ questions can freely be accessed, customized content can easily be shared, and hand-grading of worksheets can be eliminated. Also, Classtime lets students have more fun in class with our classroom games. Classtime is as rich and versatile as Moodle, and as easy and intuitive as Kahoot. Classtime is currently a privately held corporation, operating in the US, Switzerland, and the Ukraine with eight team members.

Risk, Fear and Adventure

 

Why these are essential parts of an education and how learning through challenges can help young people solve the worlds current and future problems.

Duncan Robinson

 

Duncan Robinson is project leader at Inspired Global Camps - a worldwide network of exceptional opportunities for young people.

He has over 15 years teaching Internationally and leading expeditions all over the world. He firmly believes in the importance of challenge in education as offering the best opportunities to grow and develop.

He has climbed all the classic North faces in the Alps including the Eiger, Matterhorn, Grandes Jorasses. Big wall expeditions, steep ski descents, Himalayan trips and Ironman triathlons.

Using student data to enhance learning

 

We are increasingly accumulating data about students and their learning activities. In other industries and areas of human activity the ‘digital footprints’ left when accessing online services are proving a valuable source of insight for improvement – but education has been slow to adopt the new tools and methods. This presentation will outline some of the latest innovations in the rapidly developing field of learning analytics. We will look at how students are being better supported and how the curriculum is being enhanced using data at educational institutions across the World. We will also examine the legal restrictions to using student data and the ethical objections that have emerged. Is it right, though, to persist with ineffective curricula or to allow students to fail or drop out because we are ignoring the new intelligence available to us?

Niall Sclater

 

Niall Sclater is consultant and director at Sclater Digital, an educational technology consultancy, and is affiliated faculty at the University of Amsterdam. He studied at Manchester and Glasgow Universities and has been working in the field of educational technology in higher education since 1992.

Among other positions, Niall was Director of Learning and Teaching at the Open University, responsible for institutional strategy in areas such as educational technology and learning analytics. In 2014 he branched out on his own and has been advising universities and other organisations in these areas.

In recent years most of Niall’s work has been in the field of learning analytics, using data to enhance learning, teaching and the student experience. He has been instrumental in setting up the first national learning analytics service for higher education, working with the educational charity, Jisc, in the UK. He provides guidance around institutional adoption of technologies and in particular the ethical and legal issues of using student data.

Niall has a practical focus but attempts to ground any implementations in the relevant research. He coordinates a research network in the area of learning analytics. He has published widely and is the author of Learning Analytics Explained (Routledge, 2017).

Sir Anthony Seldon

 

Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of The University of Buckingham since 2015, is one of Britain’s leading contemporary historians, educationalists, commentators and political authors.

He was a transformative head for 20 years, first of Brighton College and then Wellington College. He is author or editor of over 40 books on contemporary history, including the inside books on the last four Prime Ministers, was the co-founder and first director of the Institute for Contemporary British History, is co-founder of Action for Happiness, honorary historical adviser to 10 Downing Street, UK Special Representative for Saudi Education, a member of the Government’s First World War Culture Committee, was chair of the Comment Awards, is a director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, the President of IPEN, (International Positive Education Network), Chair of the National Archives Trust, is patron or on the board of several charities, founder of the Via Sacra Western Front Walk, and was executive producer of the film Journey’s End. He appeared on the Desert Island Discs in 2016. For the last fifteen years he has given all his money from writing and lecturing to charity.

He has three children; his wife of 34 years, Joanna, died of cancer in December 2016.

How do you nurture and pick a starfruit? Anne-Marie Canning & Paul Teulon

 

This session will consider how universities can develop their transition pipelines to support students from a diverse range of backgrounds, whilst balancing the need for fair admissions for all students.

The world’s leading universities now accept applications from across the globe with students studying a myriad of different qualifications, from a vast range of geographical, socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.

The level of competition for places is fierce, yet leading universities still seek to identify talent and potential from communities who are significantly under-represented at their institutions.

This session will review some of the most innovative and ground-breaking schemes designed to support these students to apply, focus on how fairness in admissions can still be retained and finally will consider what strategies must be implemented upon enrolment to ensure a successful transition from high school into university.

Find out how to nurture, pick and grow a star-fruit at this interactive session suitable for educators from all backgrounds.

Paul Teulon

 

Paul holds degrees in Economics from the University of Cambridge and in Mathematical Sciences from the Open University and he started his career as the first ever Schools and Colleges Liaison Officer at the University of Cambridge. From 2003 he worked at the University of Oxford as the Head of the Student Recruitment, responsible for the provision of high quality information, advice and guidance to students applying from the UK, EU and beyond. During this period the university saw an increase in applications from around 9000 per year to over 17000, including significant increases in state school and international applicants.

Paul joined King's in October 2011 as Director of Admissions, where he has responsibility for both undergraduate and postgraduate admissions. He has a specialist interest in the use of admissions testing and contextual data in admissions. He is a self-confessed stats geek and has co-authored a paper commenting on developments of the Student Number Control, 'To AAB or not to ABB: a very English Question'. He is responsible over 100,000 applications, across nearly 500 programmes and has been awarded the Outstanding Collaboration at King's Award in 2013 and the Director’s Award in 2016. Paul’s role expanded to cover Registry Services in 2015, which incorporates Student Funding, Registry Services, Timetabling, Examinations and Conduct & Appeals.

Paul has spoken at wide range of national and international conferences on issues relating to Higher Education and admissions in the UK. He served as UK Treasurer on the executive of the HELOA (Higher Education Liaison Officers Association) and also on the International ACAC (Association for College Admission Counselling) board and the board of the UKCAT (UK Clinical Aptitude Test). Paul is also a Governor and Chair of the Education Committee at the (LAE) London Academy of Excellence Tottenham, a Sixth Form School in North London and also on the board of Governors at his local comprehensive school Saffron Walden County High School.

Govinda Upadhyay

 

LEDsafari is an educational start-up based out of Lausanne. They provide online teacher training platform, ready to use content based on school curriculum and DIY solar kits to enable teachers to implement STEM education in the classroom. They are present in more than 30 countries globally and impacted 30,000 student in last two years. The founders are in Forbes30under30 list, Asia21 young leaders, EIT award, MIT leaders etc for their work on sustainability and education.

Compass For Life - Elite Leadership and Performance

 

Floyd will talk about the Compass For Life and how it enables pupils and teachers to understand themselves and practice self-leadership. It can be used by teachers leaders to bring out the real, and often hidden, goals and dreams of their children. Using a map, and the four cardinal points of the compass as a simple framework, CFL allows individuals to connect with their dreams and ambitions. It gives them an authentic purpose for learning that is highly motivational. Learning together and learning better, as part of a team, is the key.

Floyd Woodrow

 

Floyd Woodrow was one of the youngest soldiers ever to be selected for the UK’s elite Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) at the age of 22. He has served in many different operational areas globally, and was awarded the UK’s second-highest award for gallantry, the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

Floyd is now Managing Director and founder of Chrysalis Worldwide, a world leading values-based organisation, and owner of Quantum Group, recently winning an innovation award in the Fintech sector. He is also the creator of Compass For Life, which you will learn about at the festival.

"Embracing Differences : Global Citizenship and International Mindedness in International Schools"

 

The Development of Global Citizenship and Purpose and Direction are two drivers of CIS International Accreditation. While international schools are at the forefront of global education, their respective notions of international mindedness and Global Citizenship remain loosely defined and are largely expressed through activities such as MUN. This presentation will initially focus on differing interpretations of International Mindedness and Global Citizenship in schools. It will then look at how we can create an agreed contextualized definition of Global Citizenship for our own school community and how this definition can become a part of a school’s mission statement to drive forward student engagement and learning.

Ali Yusaf

 

Ali Yusaf is a mathematics teacher with over twenty years’ experience working in boarding schools. The majority of his teaching has been outside of the UK, taking him to the UAE, Norway and Switzerland. During his teaching career he has had a number of different roles including both pastoral and academic positions.

An expert in International School Accreditation, he is a co-chair with the Council of International Schools and a Visit Team member with Middle States Association, having been on accreditation visits to a number of schools around the world. His interests are in School Governance and Leadership, International Mindedness and Global Citizenship and Teacher Appraisal and Professional Development.

Ali is currently the Accreditation Coordinator at Institut Le Rosey, leading the school’s Self Study process, towards CIS reaccreditation in 2019.

#WomenEd Session 2: @WomenEd_tech and diversity in leadership

 

This session will explore representation of women in leadership positions in schools and #EdTech. Sameenna Choudry will discuss her research on the damning figures of BAME women in decision making positions in education and policy. Jules Daulby and Bukky Yusuf will explore why education technology seems to be a male dominated arena and what @WomenEd_Tech are intending to do about it.

There will also be an opportunity to learn about your professional learning networks (PLN) using social media and blogging.

Bukky Yusuf

 

Bukky Yusuf is a Secondary Science teacher, Science senior leader and consultant. She has spent two decades in London schools, teaching Science, A level Chemistry and Level 3 BTEC. Her previous school leadership roles include leading a science department and the enhancement of whole school teaching & learning through the use of Ed(ucational) Tech(nology).

As part of her commitment to increase diverse leadership within education, Bukky uses social media to participate with a number of initiatives including WomenEd and BAMEed. She is a London Regional Leader for WomenEd and is registered as a coach for the Women into leadership programme. Bukky is also a Leadership Matters Ambassador and an Education Board Member for Innovate My School.

She presents at regional and national conferences to support the development of educators at all levels. She also champions grass root projects that help colleagues maintain their well-being. Bukky is a prolific member of the Twitter community and regularly blogs.